Thu. Aug 13th, 2020

Strewnify

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Chiba, Japan 千葉県

3 min read
Chiba Meteor Event

Tokyo, JAPAN – July 2, 2020, 2:32 AM local time, U.S. Government sensors detected a large meteor fireball travelling ENE at 14.1 km/s, ending near Tokyo, above the Chiba Prefecture. Total atmospheric impact energy was equivalent to 165 tonnes of TNT!

The speed of the fireball was relatively slow, so it is very possible that fragments of the meteoroid survived the journey through the atmosphere. There were significant winds from the southwest at the time of the event, which would have blown any lighter meteorite fragments northeast. Good luck and happy hunting!

Date/Time:07/01/2020 17:32:03 UTC
Location:30km southeast of Tokyo, Japan
Reference Coordinates:35.627°N 139.936°E
Reference Altitude:22.8 km above sea level
Energy / Mass Estimate:0.365kt / 6942 kg
Reference Speed:14.1 km/s
Bearing:66.9° ENE
Slope:53.7° from vertical
Event Links:SonotaCo.JP

Video and News

Since the event happened in the early morning hours, it was not widely seen. Consequently, it did not receive widespread media coverage, but a few videos were recovered.

Local coverage of the event (in Japanese)

Search Efforts

This was a fairly large event, so you can expect meteorite hunters to be actively searching the area for a few weeks. If you woulds like to follow the search and future events in this region, please join the Facebook group:



StrewnLAB Search Area

A trajectory for this meteor was analyzed by SonotaCo.JP and run through the StrewnLAB software to predict a search area. Since the trajectory analysis was not performed by Strewnify, the error is unknown. This is an urban area, so we would expect citizens to report damage from falling meteorites, if anything sizeable reached the ground. Please download and review the Google Earth files below for details about the possible strewn field.

StrewnLAB Predicted Search Area V1
Critical Search Area near Narashino

Weather Data

The weather data below is sourced from weather balloons, and publicly available via NOAA’s Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive (IGRA). This data is downloaded and post-processed by the StrewnLAB algorithm, to account for changing weather patterns and weather balloon drift. The plots have altitude on the y-axis, in kilometers above sea level. The wind speed below 10km has large effect on the drift of meteorites.

There was a moderate wind from the west, peaking at 38 m/s @ 10 km altitude

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